12Natural Skin Care Newsletter - December 2006 12

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WILDCRAFTED HERBAL PRODUCTS

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Natural Skin Care Newsletter: December 2006 Issue

Natural Skin Care Products by Wildcrafted Herbal Products

Natural skin care products by Wildcrafted Herbal Products Natural skin care products by Wildcrafted Herbal Products

Introduction

Welcome to the December issue of the Natural Skin Care Newsletter. With Christmas at our door step and a brand New Year on the horizon there is much to look forward to.

Index of the December Issue of the Natural Skin Care Newsletter:

(You can click on the topics below which will take you to the article of choice on this page, or simply scroll down and read each one)

Articles:

Introduction
(News and What's New At Wildcrafted)

The Festive Season and You - A Christmas Lunch/Dinner With a Difference
(by Danny & Susan Siegenthaler)

How To Use Essential Oils Part 2: Using essential oils in different media such as water, base-oils, air, etc.
(by Danny & Susan Siegenthaler)

Kissing Under the Mistletoe: A European Christmas Tradition
(Author unknown)

Kitty's Corner - Healthy Gifts for Your Pet
(by Kitty-the-Cat)

December 2006 Issue of the Natural Skin Care Newsletter

in Care Systems

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

 

Once again, December is almost here and so is the end of another busy and eventful year.

This months Newsletter provides you with a Christmas-theme without groing over board. There are some great recipes for your to consider using during the festive season, especially if you are in a region of the world where Christmas is a warm/hot time of year, but even if you are in the Northern Hemisphere, you can get some great ideas too.

There's the 2nd part to our How To Use Essential Oils series of articles and we hope you'll be able to make use of the suggestions and ad a little something extra special to your life.

Please remember, should you wish to order some of our great Christmas Gift Ideas, they are handmade and we are making them almost as you order them to obtain maximum freshness and effectives. This however does mean that we do have a lag-time of up to 4 weeks, depending on the availability of ingredients and other materials. So please order sooner rather than be disappointed, we will do our very best to supply orders before Christmas, but can only do so if we get your order within the next 2 weeks.

We at Wildcrafted Herbal Products would like to take this opportunity to wish all our readers and customers a Merry Christmas and a very Happy, Fulfilling New Year !

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The Festive Season and You: A Christmas Lunch/Dinner with a Difference

With the festive season looming many of us are getting ready to celebrate Christmas and the coming New Year. This happy, joyous time however, often brings with it a tendency to over-indulge ourselves, only to find many of us getting depressed and anxious about the extra kilos we've put on.

Well, this is the time to plan. What to eat, what to drink, and how to ensure that all the fun can be had without the 'side-effect'.

For the Southern Hemisphere it is admittedly a lot easier than for our friends in the North. Summer is the time where many fruits and fresh vegetables are fresh and plentiful. The heat of Summer also provides us with an environment wherein it is easy to substitute baked food with fruit, vegetables and seafood.

So, let's have a look at the type of food combinations that could make up a typical Christmas Lunch/Dinner.

Seafood

Prawns, fish, crabs, etc. which are on offer at your local seafood merchant make a great, healthy substitute for the traditional baked turkey Christmas lunch.

Nutritionally they are less fating, contain more nutrients, including those all-important Omega oils, and don’t weigh heavy on your digestive system either.

You can combine the seafood with lots of different salads to provide a nutritious, balanced meal most everyone will enjoy.

Salads

Salads don’t have to be boring either, and they don’t have to be cold.

Here’s an idea that might appeal:

Tangy Hot Chicken Salad

A tasty, tangy, colourful chicken salad with just a little bit of a hit! Once made, this recipe looks deliciously impressive but is amazingly easy to make, taking less than 15 minutes.

Ingredients

  • 2 Chicken Breast Fillets, Skinless and Boneless
  • 150g Lettuce
  • 2 Medium Capsicum Peppers
  • 2 Onions
  • 30g Butter
  • 2 Medium Stalks Celery
  • 25g Toasted Almonds
  • 2 Dtsp Sultanas
  • 50g Sun dried Tomato & Chili Salad Dressing.

Method

  • Dice chicken into small pieces; finely chop onions and peppers.
  • Melt butter in pan over medium heat and add chicken.
  • Shred lettuce and slice celery.
  • When chicken is almost cooked, add the peppers and onions to pan to soften slightly.
  • Once chicken in cooked, drain contents of pan and toss together with lettuce, celery, almonds and sultanas.
  • Divide equally between 2 plates and drizzle on chili dressing.

Now for a couple of cold salads:

Healthy Salad

  • 1 head red cabbage, shredded
  • 1 large red Bermuda onion, sliced thin
  • 1 medium or large cucumber, sliced thin
  • 1 large tomato, sliced thin
  • 1 1-lb can chickpeas, drained
  • 1 cup virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup wine vinegar
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Mix all salad ingredients in a large bowl. Mix oil and vinegar in a separate bowl and add to salad. Salt and pepper to taste.

Variations: Add lemon juice instead of oil. If you do not like chickpeas or want other beans in the salad feel free to experiment.

Optional spices: Garlic and oregano to taste.

 

Fennel, Green Bean and Olive Salad

  • 1 lb. tender green beans, trimmed
  • 1 lg. fennel (AKA anise) bulb, about 1 lb.
  • 1/4 c. Olive oil
  • 3 T. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 canned flat anchovy fillet, minced
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed coarse salt to taste (I used Sea Salt)
  • 1/4 c. oil-cured black olives, pitted and quartered (I used small Greek olives)
  • freshly ground pepper

If green beans are large, cut them in half lengthwise. Do not use old beans. Blanch them in an abundant amount of boiling salted water until tender yet crisp, about 10 minutes. Drain and refresh under cold running water; shake dry.

Trim stalks from the fennel bulb and cut away any bruised, discoloured or tough outer leaves. Cut the bulb in half lengthwise. Trim the root end, cut out the core at the base of the bulb. Slice lengthwise into thin strips. To make the dressing, combine olive oil, lemon juice, anchovy, garlic and salt in a large salad bowl.

Before serving, removed the garlic clove, toss the fennel and green beans in the dressing. Sprinkle with olives and grind pepper over the top. Serves 4. (Note: I cheated. I place the dressing ingredients in my processor and briefly processed with the steel knife, thus ensuring no one would get a piece of the anchovy. Such is life...you either love anchovies or hate them...)

Fruit platters

These are simple to make and we’ve all made fruit platters before, but a good idea is to include some of the more exotic fruits.

Think about including some of these rather exotic, but great tasting fruits:

BAMBOO SHOOTS

Description: Bamboo Shoots are harvested as soon as they appear above the ground, while they are still young. Extremely popular in China and Asia, Bamboo Shoots can be boiled, sautéed, or steamed as an accompaniment to meat or fish. Braised in soy sauce and spices, sliced Bamboo Shoots are often served as appetizers or added to soups, stews and various other Oriental dishes.

Preparing/serving: Bamboo shoots must be peeled and cooked before using. Do not eat bamboo shoots raw. Trim the roots, peel the outer leaves (sheath leaves), and remove any tough flesh - tender leaves can be left attached.

 

BLACK SAPOTE Diospyros digyna

“NATURES NATURAL CHOCOLATE”

Other names: Chocolate Pudding Fruit, Black Persimmon.

Intro: Not a fresh fruit to be eaten off the tree.

History: Native to Mexico.

Shape: The fruit is about the size of a very large apple and tomato-shaped.

Weight/size: Typically weighing 700g to 900g and ranging between 60 -120mm in diameter.

Colour: The fruit has a bright green and shiny skin when unripe. When it ripens, the skin turns dark brown.

The flesh is black when ripe.

Taste: The flesh tastes like chocolate, but only when perfectly ripe. The taste is otherwise slightly bitter.

Buying/storage: The crown on top of the fruit should be raised, which indicates the fruit is mature. During ripening, changes of the fruit are dramatic: overnight it turns dark green and later brown-black, and goes from rock hard to soft and mushy. Do not refrigerate until ripe. Ripe fruit or pulp may be refrigerated for a few days, however, freezing is better. Frozen whole fruit or pulp retains its subtle flavour for more than six months, and frozen pulp is suitable for use in any recipe.

Preparing/serving: Only eaten when very soft. Simply cut the fruit in half around the centre and scoop out the flesh and remove the seeds. Very soft fruit has a delicate skin, which may disintegrate when cut. Flavour is enhanced by the addition of a little rum, vanilla, cream or coffee liqueur (Kahlua or Tia Maria). It makes a delicious ice cream and is also great in mousses, cakes, cheesecakes, muffins, bread and preserves.

 

BREADFRUIT Artocarpus altilis

Other names: Breadnut (seeded selection)

Intro: Introduced into Far North Queensland by Samoan missionaries from the Pacific Islands, where it forms part of the staple diet. The fruit is famous for its role in the mutiny of the “Bounty” where Captain Bligh was commissioned to transport the fruit from Tahiti to the West Indies.

History: Native to the Pacific and East Indies.

Shape: Round to egg-shaped fruit.

Weight/size: Weighs up to 4kg and about 20cm in diameter

Colour: Breadfruit has a thick, warty, greenish skin and white starchy flesh with a bread-like texture.

Taste: Sweet when eaten ripe.

Buying/storage: Choose breadfruit which are free from blemishes. It can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week, but the skin will darken

Preparing/serving: Breadfruit is normally eaten as a vegetable. It can be peeled and boiled, roasted or fried like potatoes, baked whole in the oven or barbecued. Wipe utensils with cooking oil to prevent the latex from sticking. Latex can also be removed with eucalyptus oil. Breadfruit seeds are used in a similar way to jakfruit seeds. If breadfruit is allowed to ripen, the flesh becomes light yellow, very soft and very sweet. Ripe breadfruit is also used for dessert dishes. Stage of ripeness is critical to any recipe using breadfruit.

 

CARAMBOLA Averrhoa carambola

Other names: Starfruit, Five corner, Five Fingers

Intro: The fruit has been grown in Far North Queensland for a long time, however, the fruit of this variety tends to be small and sour. The new selections are generally larger and more flavoursome. The carambola has been cultivated in Asia since ancient times. Carambolas (Fwang Tung) are a good substitute for apples in recipes.

History: Native to Indonesia and the Moluccas.

Shape: The fruit is oval. It consists of five prominent ribs (sometimes four or six), which run its entire length. Slicing crosswise produces star shaped slices, which explains why it is known as "Starfruit."

Weight/size: The carambola is typically 5cm to 12cms long, between 2.5cm and 6cms in diameter, and weighs from 115g to 385g.

Colour: The thin, waxy skin of carambolas is either a translucent pale yellow or green. Two to 12 flat seeds are lodged inside the ribs.

Taste: Very crisp, juicy and refreshing. Yellow fruit tend to be sweet and green ones more acid.

Buying/storage: Choose fruit that is firm and undamaged. It will keep in the refrigerator, covered, for up to two weeks.

Preparing/serving: The fruit is generally eaten fresh. If the carambola ribs show brown lines, remove before slicing to give a sweeter taste. Slicing crosswise produces star shaped slices that are great for decoration. It is also a good fruit for salads, juicing, ice tea, tropical drinks, chutneys or on skewers with shrimp or chicken. The green fruit can be used as a vegetable and for pickling. Immature fruit can be used as a souring agent in curries.

 

CUSTARD APPLE (SUGAR APPLE) Annona sp.

Other names: Sweetsop

Intro: Developed in Hawaii in the early 1900s. Found in many Far North Queensland backyards.

History: Native to South America and the West Indies.

Shape: Generally round to oval.

Weight/size: Typically 10cm to 20cm long and up to 10cm in width, weighing 100g to 500g, but may

reach 2kg.

Colour: The scaly-like yellowish-green or tan skin, which can vary from thin to thick, may be smooth with fingerprint-like markings or covered with rounded protuberances. The flesh is creamy white.

Taste: Sweet and juicy aromatic flavour that lingers.

Buying/storage: Choose a fruit without dark blemishes. Unripe fruit should be kept at room temperature until ripe. Custard Apples can be kept in the refrigerator for a day or two.

Preparing/serving: Fruit should be eaten fresh. Simply chill then cut it in half lengthwise and scoop out the flesh, removing the inedible seeds. For a treat, add a dollop of fresh cream. It can be used in jellies and sorbets and mixed with water for a refreshing drink. It also makes an excellent fruit sauce when mixed with banana and cream.

JABOTICABA Myrciaria cauliflora

Other names: Jabuticaba, Guaperu

History: Originates from Southern Brazil.

Shape: Grape-like.

Weight/size: Average size is 2.5cm in diameter, but can vary from 1.5cm to 3.5cm.

Colour: Jaboticaba has a purple-black, tough skin with a translucent flesh and is similar in texture to a grape.

Taste: Sweet slightly aromatic with a pleasant grape-like flavour.

Buying/storage: Choose fruit, which is full and not shrivelled or too soft. Can be frozen whole.

Preparing/serving: Fresh fruit is delicious eaten out-of-hand and can be made into jellies, jams and wine. The skin is high in tannin and can be bitter, however, it contributes to the deep red colour of jams, jellies, and wines. Frozen fruit can be used as a garnish in fruit salads.

These are some ideas of how to create a talking point and feed your guests something different and nutritious too.

 

Now, for the cocktails.

Cool, refreshing drinks are always a must during those hot summer days, so here are some Non-Alcoholic recipes you can easily make at home:

Fun-in-the-Sun

    1 1/2 oz. Pineapple juice (1 oz = 30ml)

    1 oz. Grape juice

    1 1/2 oz. Lemonade (7-up or similar)

    1 tsp. Sugar syrup

APPLEADE

Chop up two large apples and pour a pint of boiling water over them.  Sprinkle in about a teaspoon of sugar and leave to stand for a few minutes.  Strain the liquid and leave to cool.  Serve with plenty of ice and garnish with a wedge of apply and a slice of lemon.

BOO BOO'S SPECIAL

Shake together equal quantities of orange juice and pineapple juice, a squeeze of lemon juice, a dash of Angostura bitters, a dash of grenadine and a scoop of crushed ice.  Serve unstrained, garnish with fruit and top with a little water if desired.

CARDINAL PUNCH

Over ice cubes pour four parts cranberry juice, two parts orange juice, one part lemon juice and ginger ale to top up.  Garnish with fruit and serve with straws.

INSTANT GRENADINE

Put a few ice cubes in a long glass add the grenadine, lemon and lime juice and top up with soda water.

Garnish with citrus slices and wipe the rim of the glass with a wedge of lemon or lime.

You get the idea.

I hope this collection of ideas for an alternative to the traditional Christmas lunch/dinner will inspire you to have a healthy, enjoyable Christmas feast with a difference.

 


   Don't forget to have a look at our Great Christmas Gif Ideas    

 

How To Use Essential Oils Part 2: How to use essential oils in different media such as water, base-oils, air, etc.

Essential oils have literally hundreds of applications and can be used in just about all aspects of our daily lives, from creating a relaxing atmosphere in the bathroom to deodorising bins in your kitchen. From making your own natural skin care products, to creating a healing environment in a sick room, but how do you use essential oils in different media?

This article will discuss several different means by which you can use essential oils. We will look at:

  • Vaporisation,
  • Applications using water,
  • Direct application to objects, and
  • Application through the use of creams and massage oils

Vaporising of Essential Oils

There are at least a couple of different and effective ways to vaporise essential oils. The most frequently used is through the use of an Aromatherapy Burner. These burners use a candle to heat a suspended dish, which contains 10-15mls of water and a few drops of one or more essential oil.

This is a great and effective way to vaporise essential oils into the air to fill a room with a pleasing aroma, which could effectively be used to disinfect, deodorise or just fill the room with a pleasing sent.

The candles used will last from 2-8 hours depending on the quality and size of the candle. You must make sure that the dish continues to contain water as otherwise the dish of the burner may break and your aromatherapy burner will be in ruins. It is better to use more water than not enough, you can always add a few extra drops of your favourite oil blend to the water if you like.

There are also electric diffusers you can purchase. These are safer than candle burners, as there is no fire threat with the electric warmer. You don’t need to add water to the dish either.

To clean these dishes, just use pure eucalyptus or lemon oil to get rid of any oil residues.

Vaporising essential oils can also be due using very hot or recently boiled water. After the water has boiled, poor it into a bowl and add a few (usually only 2-3 drops) of the oil blend you wish to use, cover your head with a towel and lower your face over the bowl. This is an ideal way to treat congested sinuses and upper respiratory complaints. The steam and therein suspended essential oils will help to unblock congestion and free the nasal sinuses.

Depending on the oil blend, the essential oils will also help in fighting the bacteria, or viral infection causing the problem in the first place. We will discuss how to choose oils in a subsequent article.

Using Essential oils In Water

Water is another great medium to use for application of essential oils. Food baths, hand baths, sitz- or whole-baths are great ways to indirectly ‘ingest’ essential oils.

Essential oils are absorbed by your skin and whether you apply the oils directly to your skin or indirectly via a bath, the oils will nevertheless penetrate into your body.

For example, a bath reduces tension and anxiety, calms the nervous system, enhances the removal of waste from the body, softens the skin aiding in the removal of dead skin layers, and is just about one of the most relaxing things you can do to treat your self. And, you haven’t even added any essential oils yet.

Make up the bath with up to 1 kg of Epsom salts and 6-8 drops of your chosen essential oils. Stay in the bath for 20 minutes. Then, dry off well and lie flat on your bed, on a large, dry towel, Cover yourself with a towel and with another towel cushioning your neck and head. Cover yourself with a quilt and lie still for 20 minutes. If you like, you can then complete the treatment with a cold shower, to stimulate your  blood circulation and wake yourself up.

However, you do not need to have a full-body bath to produce therapeutic effects with essential oils. Foot baths have long been used to treat various disorders from stress to headaches and many other illnesses.

Migraine headaches can be effectively treated using a large bowl of very warm to hot water from 15 minutes. Just make up a bowl full of hot water, as hot as you can possibly stand it, and put your feet into the water. Site and relax for 15 minutes and you will feel the pain reducing fairly quickly. To enhance the effect of the water bath, you can add one or two different essential oils which are known to help in the treatment of headaches and migraines to the water. (Again we’ll cover the type of essential oils you would choose in a future article. Here it is about how to use the oils not which oils to use).

Hand-baths are the same as foot-baths, but using the hands as the absorptive surface. Follow the directions for a foot-bath above.

Direct application to objects

Direct application of essential oils to objects is another very useful way to obtain the beneficial effects of essential oils.

For example, you can use a few drops (3-5 drop) of essential oil on a handkerchief, which you slip into your pillow slip cover at night to help you relax and get a good night’s sleep. Or you can put a few drops of essential oil on the collar of your jumper or shirt so that over the next several hours you will inhale the evaporating essential oil. This method is ideal in the prevention of ‘catching’ cold when going to the office where several others are suffering from the typical seasonal flu.

Another useful way to use essential oils is to prevent moths and other insects from getting into your clothes, is to apply a specifically formulated blend of essential oils to some thick, natural material such as pure wool, place this wood into a small cotton bag and hand it into the cupboard or put it into the suitcase where you store your clothes for the next season. This will reduce the moths and silverfish and help to protect your clothes without making them smell of camphor or insecticide. You will need to check from time to time if the essential oils have evaporated and refresh the wool/cotton bag to maximise protection of your clothes.

Another useful direct application of essential oils is for the purpose of deodorising your garbage bin. These can get rather smelly and unpleasant. Apply a few drops of essential oil to a Kleenex and place in the bottom of your garbage bin. This will help to keep your garbage bin smell fresher for longer and the added benefit is that some oils will help in disinfecting the bin and keeping bacteria at lower levels.

Using essential oils to disinfect hard surfaces is another way of direct application of essential oils. You can safely use essential oils that are disinfectant to keep hard surfaces clean and disinfected.

A word of caution, Peppermint oil, if applied neat to plastics and many other surfaces will damage the material. It will dissolve the pain on a car in a matter of seconds. So be warned, this oils is not to be played around with.

Application of Essential Oils in Creams and Massage Oils

This is probably one of the most popular ways of using essential oils. Massage oils have been made using essential oils to enhance the therapeutic effect of massage for a long, long time. Essential oils when used in conjunction with massage have a great deal of use, ranging from applications in musculoskeletal problems to just about any disorder you can name. Using specifically blended formulae it is possible to treat anxiety, depression, digestive disorder, nervous disorders, circulatory problems, and the list goes on.

The limit is at the skill of the therapist and their knowledge of the essential oils and massage techniques.

Using creams as a medium to deliver essential oils to the body is another great way to utilise the powerful properties of essential oils. Creams and lotions can be applied all over the body or to deliver the oils to specific areas only.

For example a therapeutic cream formulated for arthritic aches and pains may be rubbed onto the affected area of discomfort. Similarly, eczema sufferers may apply a specifically formulated cream to the area of their skin that is affected by the eczema or dermatitis.

The beauty industry has also made good use of essential oils for a long time. There are literally hundreds of products that utilise the beneficial properties of essential oils in their creams and lotions.

You can easily make your own creams and lotions using a base cream/lotion and adding a few drops of essential oils. You can either make the base cream from scratch, or buy one from several manufactures or you local chemist. Depending on the type of cream you want, you may have to shop around and do some research, but even 100% natural cream bases are relatively easy to find.

Now you know how to use the essential oils in a variety of ways, depending on what functions you want them to perform. The next article in this series will look at the different essential oils and what they can be used for.

 

`1   Don't forget to have a look at our Great Christmas Gif Ideas     23

Kissing Under the Mistletoe: A European Christmas Tradition

Kissing under the mistletoe has long been a part of Christmas tradition. But just what is mistletoe and how did it's association with Christmas evolve?

Mistletoe is especially interesting botanically, because it is a partial parasite (a "hemiparasite"). As a parasitic plant, it grows on the branches or trunk of a tree and actually sends out roots that penetrate into the tree and take up nutrients. But mistletoe is also capable for growing on its own; like other plants it can produce its own food by photosynthesis. Mistletoe, however, is more commonly found growing as a parasitic plant.

There are two types of mistletoe. The mistletoe that is commonly used as a Christmas decoration (Phoradendron flavescens), which is native to North America and grows on trees from New Jersey to Florida. The other type of mistletoe, Viscum album, is of European origin and the one primarily used in herbal medicine. The Greeks and earlier peoples thought that it had mystical powers and down through the centuries it became associated with many folklore customs.

The European mistletoe is a green shrub with small, yellow flowers and white, sticky berries which are considered poisonous. It commonly seen on apple but only rarely on oak trees. The rarer oak mistletoe was greatly venerated by the ancient Celts and Germans and used as a ceremonial plant by early Europeans.

The common name of the plant is derived from the ancient belief that mistletoe was propagated from bird droppings. This belief was related to the then-accepted principle that life could spring spontaneously from dung. It was observed in ancient times that mistletoe would often appear on a branch or twig where birds had left droppings. "Mistel" is the Anglo-Saxon word for "dung," and "tan" is the word for "twig". So, mistletoe means "dung-on-a-twig".

By the sixteenth century, botanists had discovered that the mistletoe plant was spread by seeds that had passed through the digestive tract of birds. One of the earliest written references to this appeared in England, in 1532, in an Herbal published by Turner. Botanists of the time also observed that the sticky berry seeds of the mistletoe tended to cling to the bills of birds. When the birds cleaned their bills by rubbing them against the branches or bark of trees, the the seeds were further scattered.

From the earliest times mistletoe has been one of the most magical, mysterious, and sacred plants of European folklore. It was considered a bestower of life and fertility; a protectant against poison; and an aphrodisiac.

The mistletoe of the sacred oak was especially sacred to the ancient Celtic Druids. On the sixth night of the moon white-robed Druid priests would cut the oak mistletoe with a golden sickle. Two white bulls would be sacrificed amid prayers that the recipients of the mistletoe would prosper.

Later, the ritual of cutting the mistletoe from the oak came symbolize the emasculation of the old King by his successor. Mistletoe was long regarded as both a sexual symbol and the "soul" of the oak. It was gathered at both mid-summer and winter solstices, and the custom of using mistletoe to decorate houses at Christmas is a survival of the Druid and other pre-Christian traditions. (Mistletoe is still ceremonially plucked on mid-summer eve in some Celtic and Scandinavian countries.)

In the Middle Ages and later, branches of mistletoe were hung from ceilings to ward off evil spirits. In Europe they were placed over house and stable doors to prevent the entrance of witches.

It was also believed that the oak mistletoe could extinguish fire. This was associated with an earlier belief that the mistletoe itself could come to the tree during a flash of lightning.

In parts of England and Wales farmers would give the Christmas bunch of mistletoe to the first cow that calved in the New Year. This was thought to bring good luck to the entire herd.

Kissing under the mistletoe is first found associated with the Greek festival of Saturnalia and later with primitive marriage rites. Mistletoe was believed to have the power of bestowing fertility, and the dung from which the mistletoe was thought to arise was also said to have "life-giving" power.

In Scandinavia, mistletoe was considered a plant of peace, under which enemies could declare a truce or warring spouses kiss and make-up.

In some parts of England the Christmas mistletoe is burned on the twelfth night lest all the boys and girls who have kissed under it never marry.

And for those who wish to observe the correct etiquette: a man should pluck a berry when he kisses a woman under the mistletoe, and when the last berry is gone, there should be no more kissing!

Today's herbalists use Mistletoe (Viscum album) for its following actions: Nervine, antispasmodic, tonic and narcotic. It has a great reputation for curing the 'falling sickness' epilepsy - and other convulsive nervous disorders. It has also been employed in checking internal haemorrhage.

It's active constituents include: mistletoe lectins (also called viscotoxins), choline derivatives, alkaloids, polypeptides, and polysaccharides. Some test tube and animal studies suggest that certain mistletoe constituents, including the alkaloids, can also kill cancer cells.

 

32   Don't forget to have a look at our Great Christmas Gif Ideas     23

 

We hope you enjoyed these articles and wish you and all your family a wonderful, peaceful and happy Christmas and of course a fabulous New Year

In good health

Danny & Susan Siegenthaler

 

PS: Don't forget Christmas is fast approaching and we have some fantastic Christmas Gift Sets just for you, but you will have to be quick.

© Copyright: Wildcrafted Herbal Products, 2006

Wildcrafted's Natural Skin Care Newsletter - Back Issues

Kitty's Corner

Kitty

Hi I'm Kitty, I hope you enjoyed the last column and managed to dry your cat's eyes.

This month we are going to look at your pet's weight.

As we are hearing every day in the media, obesity is one of Australia's biggest health issues for our owners. Well, this is not just something that's affecting you pet owners, we pets are getting bigger all the time as well. In fact, 25-30% of us are overweight.

I know, you just can't resist those eyes of ours, and you want us to live a life of luxury and after all we do deserve those special treats. And of course, we love every yummy morsel you give us. The problem though is that if we don't get enough exercise, these treats and extra feeds will cause us to develop conditions such as arthritis, pancreatitis, heart disease and diabetes (especially in us cats). Now you don't want to do that to us, do you?!

Well, here are some guidelines as to how you can determine if we are getting a little on the chubby side:

* If your pooch or kitty-cat is within the ideal weight range, you should be able to feel each of the ribs as you run your fingers along the ribcage.

* We should also have a waste! Just have a look while standing over your beloved pet and see if you can actually notice a well defined waistline.

* Now some of us kitty-cats can actually develop a 'beer gut', boy, you don't want to do that to us sleek and slender mini-tigers, do you? - No, of course not.

Just like humans, we too benefit from a regular exercise regime and depending on your cat, you can devise a variety of play-activities to make us loose those extra kilos. Throwing a bouncy ball, or a game involving a string and similar toys can get our heart rate jumping and make us want to catch these things.

We are hunters after all and catching things is fun. Your dog's too love chasing things such as sticks and tennis balls and you can give them a heap of exercise in your backyard just by playing with us for a little while each day. After all we like the input you give us too and we'll love you even more for the time you spend with us.

paw

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Looking for Christmas Gifts?
Beat the Christmas Rush and Have a Look at these Great Gift Sets

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Ginseng Hydrator & After Shave Balm

Ginseng Hydrator

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Topical Articles on skin care and the benefits of using NATURAL skin care products
 
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Great Christmas Gifts & Christmas Gift Ideas

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Got a skin condition and need some professional advice? - Consult our Virtual Herbalist - it's easy and it's free.

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Age Defying Natural  Skin Care Systems for even the most sensitive skin types.


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Testimonials

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Natural Skin Care
Treat Your Skin to the Best Nature has to offer.

Rose Day Cream

Rose Day Cream

View Price List / Add to Cart

Looking for Natural Skin Care?
Look no further... Choose Natural Skin Care Products form Wildcrafted Herbal Products to look after Your Skin Naturally
.

Want Chemical-free, Natural Skin Care?
Choose Wildcrafted Herbal Products to Look After Your Skin Naturally.

- - -

Look Younger & Feel Younger with Wildcrafted's Age-Defying Essence

Age Defying Essence

View Price List / Add to Cart


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Why you should Choose Holistically Natural Skin Care Products made by Wildcrafted Herbal Products

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Look Younger & Feel Younger with Wildcrafted's Age-Defying Essence

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Have a look at these Luxurious Christmas Gift Ideas

123

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Got a heath problem and need some professional advice? - Consult our Virtual Herbalist - it's easy and it's free.

- - -

Age Defying Natural  Skin Care Systems for even the most sensitive skin types.


- - -

Testimonials

- - -

Want Chemical-free, Natural Skin Care?
Choose Wildcrafted Herbal Products to Look After Your Skin Naturally.

- - -

It's a Guy Thing?
Men too need to look after their skin - but is men's skin different?

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Visit our Natural Skin Care Forum - It's fun, Informative and full of handy tips.

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Natural Skin Care Blog A selection of interesting Articles on natural skin care.

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Gift Set

Looking for Christmas Gifts?
Beat the Christmas Rush and Have a Look at these Great Gift Sets

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Ginseng Hydrator & After Shave Balm

Men's Gifts

Ginseng Hydrator

View Price List / Add to Cart

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Why you should Choose Holistically Natural Skin Care Products made by Wildcrafted Herbal Products

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Topical Articles on skin care and the benefits of using NATURAL skin care products
 
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Need Help with a Skin Problem?
Consult The Virtual Skin Doctor


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Great Christmas Gifts & Christmas Gift Ideas

234

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Got a skin condition and need some professional advice? - Consult our Virtual Herbalist - it's easy and it's free.

- - -

Age Defying Natural  Skin Care Systems for even the most sensitive skin types.

Age Defying Essence
View Price List / Add to Cart

- - -

Natural Skin Care
Treat Your Skin to the Best Nature has to offer.

Rose Day Cream

Rose Day Cream

View Price List / Add to Cart

All our Moisturisers are also available in New Spray Dispenser Bottles

Gift set 3

- - -

Looking for Natural Skin Care?
Look no further... Choose Natural Skin Care Products form Wildcrafted Herbal Products to look after Your Skin Naturally
.

- - -

Want Chemical-free, Natural Skin Care?
Choose Wildcrafted Herbal Products to Look After Your Skin Naturally.

- - -

Look Younger & Feel Younger with Wildcrafted's Age-Defying Essence

Age Defying Lotion

View Price List / Add to Cart


- - -

Why you should Choose Holistically Natural Skin Care Products made by Wildcrafted Herbal Products

- - -

Look Younger & Feel Younger with Wildcrafted's Age-Defying Essence

- - -

Have a look at these Luxurious Christmas Gift Ideas

234

- - -





Got a heath problem and need some professional advice? - Consult our Virtual Herbalist - it's easy and it's free.

- - -

Age Defying Natural  Skin Care Systems for even the most sensitive skin types.


- - -

Testimonials

- - -

It's a Guy Thing?
Men too need to look after their skin - but is men's skin different?

Gift Set 4

- - -

Visit our Natural Skin Care Forum - It's fun, Informative and full of handy tips.

- - -

Natural Skin Care Blog A selection of interesting Articles on natural skin care.

natural skin care products

WILDCRAFTED HERBAL PRODUCTS
ABN 97 131 307 643

P.O. Box 111
Kurmond, NSW, 2757
Australia

email: Contact
phone: +61 2 4573 0784 - international
phone: (02) 4573 0784 - within Australia

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Wildcrafted's Natural Skin Care Products are Your Natural Skin Care Solution

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