Natural Skin Care Newsletter - January 2007

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WILDCRAFTED HERBAL PRODUCTS

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Natural Skin Care Newsletter: January 2007 Issue

Natural Skin Care Products by Wildcrafted Herbal Products

Natural skin care products by Wildcrafted Herbal Products Natural skin care products by Wildcrafted Herbal Products

Introduction

Welcome to the first 2007 issue of the Natural Skin Care Newsletter. We have packed a variety of topics into this issue hoping that at least some of the articles will be of interest to you.

We hope you'll enjoy reading this month's issue.

Index of the January Issue of the Natural Skin Care Newsletter:

(You can click on the topics below which will take you to the article of choice on this page, or simply scroll down and read each one)

Articles:

Introduction
(News and What's New At Wildcrafted)

Trends in Skin Care for 2007
(by Danny & Susan Siegenthaler)

Natural Face-Lift Using Acupuncture
(by Danny & Susan Siegenthaler)

How To Use Essential Oils - Part 3: Essential Oils & How To Use Them
(by Danny & Susan Siegenthaler)

Calendula: A powerful healing plant
(by Danny & Susan Siegenthaler)

Kitty's Corner - Heat Stress and Your Pet
(by Kitty-the-Cat)

January 2007 Issue of the Natural Skin Care Newsletter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

 

Welcome to the January Newsletter. We hope you had a great Christmas and are looking forward to the New Year. We at Wildcrafted would like to take this opportunity to wish all of our readers a great New Year with lots of positive, exiting and enjoyable events to fill your lives in 2007.

We hope you'll enjoy the articles in this month's Newsletter and remember, we always welcome feedback, questions and comments from you.

Happy reading and shopping!

- - -

What Trends will we see in Skin Care During 2007

The last few years have seen a focus on products that attempt to halt, slow down or even reverse the aging process of the skin. We have seen an explosion of anti-aging products on to the marked that claim to remove lines and wrinkles in no time. With each new product we were introduced to terms such as 'Neutraceuticles' and the like, each as meaningless as the next. We saw the promotion of Botox injections, machines for microdermabrasion, laser skin resurfacing and a variety of other gadgets, creams and lotions that supposedly make the skin look visibly younger.

Over the past 2 years, the natural approach to skin care has also enjoyed new growth with more and more women, and more recently men, looking for safer, natural alternatives to skin care. Natural skin care products have seen an amazing increase in demand in the last 12-24 months, and this demand will continue to increase for some time. This is primarily because consumers are becoming more aware of the potentially harmful effects of some of the ingredients commonly used in commercially available skin care.

Just as in the last few decades of the 20th Century, when consumers became more aware of the potentially hazardous effects of artificial colours and flavours, all too often added to our foods and drinks, today, this awareness is spreading into other areas of our lives.

The skin is the largest organ of the human body and it can and does absorb chemicals it is in contact with. As consumers are educating themselves about skin care, they are realising that many of the ingredients they put on their skin, end up in the blood stream. As a result, they are increasingly reading labels, contacting companies asking what their ingredients consist of, and are becoming more selective about what they are willing to put on their skin. This trend will continue not just during 2007, but well beyond.

Other areas of skin care, which are starting to come under increasing scrutiny from consumers, are treatments such as Botox injections, and cosmetic surgery. If the current trend in the USA is any guide, Acupuncture will feature greatly as a natural alternative to Botox injections and cosmetic surgery. Acupuncture is a proven, effective, and ancient form of treatment. Cosmetic Acupuncture, however, is not well known in the west, but media reports are starting to emerge about the use and effectiveness of Acupuncture to treat facial lines and wrinkles.

Cosmetic Acupuncture is a totally natural, side-effect-free method of reducing lines and wrinkles, indeed, it not only has the capacity to smooth out those unwanted menaces, but tones the skin and underlying muscles. No doubt, Home-Acupuncture kits and devices will soon be promoted together with microdermabrasion machines and the like.

So, the key trends in skin care for 2007 will see continued, increasing demand for natural skin care products, as well as a demand for qualified Acupuncturist specialising in Cosmetic Acupuncture.

Surprisingly, an area that has not yet seen a major trend toward natural ingredients but which will come into consumer focus soon, is natural cosmetics, such as eye shadows, lipsticks, etc. This will be the next area of beauty care where consumes will demand products containing natural ingredients.

 


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Natural Face-Lift Using Acupuncture

The natural aging process has a habit of catching up with all of as, but there are natural ways to maintain the youthful look of your skin. A natural face-lift using Acupuncture is one such method of keeping those lines and wrinkles at bay. This article looks at how acupuncture can give you a natural face-lift with out side effects, use of potentially toxic chemicals or the expense and pain of plastic surgery.

The Problem

The natural aging process does catch up with each one of us sooner or later, which is why more and more, women and men too, are looking for a natural face-lift. That is, they are looking for a way to maintain their youthful looking facial skin, naturally. Face-lifts using surgery, or cosmetic face-lifts using products such as Botox injections, are being replaced at least in part, by natural methods.

A Solution

Acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat disease of all kinds, and lines and wrinkles on the faces are part of that. After all, if Acupuncture can treat diseases of the body, why would it not work on our aging facial skin.

Face-lifts are common place these days, but not everyone wants to spend tens-of-thousands of dollars for on a plastic surgeon, or have potentially toxic chemicals injected into their skin. More and more people are looking toward natural skin care solutions such as natural and organic skin care products and now Acupuncture for maintaining their youthful looks.

How Acupuncture Works

PicAcupuncture uses acupuncture points, located all over the body to stimulate the body’s own energy. Each point has specific actions, but can also have complex interactions when used together with other acupuncture points.

Typically a face-lift using acupuncture would involve a selection from points such as:

  • CO. 20 (Yang Xiang)
  • S.I. 18 (Quan Liao)
  • TH. 23 (Si Zhu Kong)
  • GB. 1 (Tong Zi Liao), GB. 14 (Yang Bai)
  • ST. 2 (Si Bai), ST. 3 (Ju Liao), ST. 4 (Di Cang)
  • Yin Tang, Yu Yao

In addition, other points on the body would be selected to treat any underlying health problems, which would also have an effect on the healthy look of an individual. Let's face it, if you are feeling a million dollars, you'll probably look better than if you're feeling low in energy and lack basic health.

As we age, gravity has a more pronounced effect on our skin. In terms of traditional Chinese medicine, this is associated with depleting Kidney Yin/Yang energy and is often accompanied by 'blood and qi' deficiency. The result is less tone in your skin and the development of lines and wrinkles.

How Much Does Acupuncture Cost?

In Australia an Acupuncture session would cost you around $100.- and you would need at least 6-8 treatment over 4-8 weeks to get results. Yes, you would need to undergo this once or twice a year, depending on your age and general health. Compare that to Botox injections or surgery, and you will save yourself a lot of money and pain, not to mention avoiding nasty side effects.

Summing Up

Natural face-lifts are simply a better option. You don't need to use potentially toxic chemicals, nor do you run any risk associated with even the most minor of surgical procedures and you do not need to worry about side effects. Acupuncture will not cause any lasting side effects. At worst, you may get a small bruise where a needle was inserted, but it will clear up in a matter of a day or two and the Acupuncture itself is not painful. In fact Acupuncture is usually very relaxing and energising.

Natural face-lifts are increasingly more sought after and Acupuncture is a very simple, effective way to get results. Make sure the person you choose is well qualified and is an accredited member of a national association.

 

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How to Use Essential Oils Part 3: Different essential oils and what they can be used for.

Essential oils are powerful substances with incredible healing potential. Scientists are increasingly looking at essential oils for their properties and possible applications. Much attention has been given to a number of essential oils for their anti-microbial and antiseptic properties, as well as many other diseases and conditions for which orthodox medicine seems to have few answers.

However, this article is not looking at the science that is going on. Rather we will discuss the tried and tested applications of several major essential oils that are safe to use and readily available.

Choosing Your Essential Oils

Obviously we can’t discuss all the essential oils in this Article, however, you can review a more comprehensive list of Essential oils by looking at our INGREDIENTSpage, which lists quite a few more oils and by clicking on the name of the oil in this and the Ingredients list, you can find out much more detail about each of the essential oils you are interested in.

Oil

Fragrance

Note

Properties

Bergamot

Fresh and sharp

Middle

Antiseptic, astringent, antidepressant. Used for acne and greasy skin or hair. Sensitizes the skin to ultra-violet light, so do not use just before sunbathing.

Chamomile

Fruity, apple-like

Middle

Calming, soothes the nerves. Suitable for sensitive skins. Used in hair products to lighten bond hair.

Clary Sage

Green and herby

Top

Astringent, stimulating. Used as a fixative in perfumes; an ingredient of eau de Cologne.

Eucalyptus

Fresh and tangy

Top

Antiseptic and stimulating. Used for treating coughs and colds, and aching.

Frankincense

Woody

Base

Calming, aids relaxation, treats respiratory problems. Said to combat wrinkles.

Geranium

Sharp and flowery

Middle

Astringent, diuretic, antidepressant. Tones the skin, helps to blend a fragrance, and acts as an insect repellent.

Jasmine

Exotic and sweet

Base

Antidepressant, aphrodisiac, said to speed up labour. Good for treating postnatal depression.

Lavender

Fresh

Middle

Antiseptic, analgesic, calming. Treats headaches, insomnia, depression, aches, pains, wounds, insect bites.

Marjoram

Green

Middle

Analgesic, sedative, warming, comforting. Treats aches and pains, period pains, insomnia and headaches. Increases local blood circulation, so useful after exercise.

Neroli (Orange Blossom)

Sweet

Middle

Sedative, calming, aphrodisiac. Helps anxiety and insomnia. Especially suitable for dry skin.

Petitgrain (Leaves of the bitter orange)

Sweet

Middle

Sedative, calming and refreshing. Treats anxiety and insomnia. Known as “poor man’s Neroli”.

Rose

Sweet and luxurious

Base

Antiseptic, sedative, antidepressant. Extremely expensive, but only a little is needed to add its distinctive fragrance.

Rosemary

Sharp and herby

Middle

Stimulating, helps memory and clear thinking. Treats rheumatic pain, and aches and pains after exercise. Used in shampoo and hair conditioner to enrich dark hair.

Sandalwood

Exotic and luxurious

Base

Antiseptic, sedative, calming, aphrodisiac. Suitable for dry, dehydrated skin and, because it is antiseptic, used on acne. Helps to blend a fragrance.

Tea Tree Oil

Sharp and spicy

Top

Antiseptic, germicidal, fungicidal, soothing and healing. Treats cuts, burns, infections, pimples and boils.

Ylang Ylang

Exotic and sweet

Base

Antidepressant, sedative, antiseptic, aphrodisiac. Allays anxiety, good for problem of oily skins.

 

Combining your knowledge

Over the past 3 months, we have looked at the ways you can use essential oils in your life. Initially we looked at the various actions and properties of various essential oils. This provided an insight into the essential oils that had particular properties. For example we looked at Anti-septic oils, which included: Basil, Bergamot, Clary sage, Chamomile, Cyprus, Eucalyptus, Fennel, Frankincense, Geranium, Jasmine, Juniper, Lavender, Lemon, Lime, Marjoram, Neroli, Patchouli, Peppermint, Rose, Tea tree, and many other essential oils.

Then, in the second article, we examined the different ways essential oils can be applied. For example you can use Lavender oil in a diffuser which is to be placed in your bedroom in order to help you go to sleep. Or you can add 3-5 drops into a bath to help relax and unwind, after a stressful day.

In this, the 3rd article, we have so far looked at the specific actions of a particular essential oil, what type of fragrance it has and what ‘note’ it has.

What’s a Note, you ask?

Blending Techniques

When creating an oil blend, we need to not only consider what we want the blend to do, based upon the indications for each of the oils chosen, but also what the resulting blend will smell like – will we like to use it?

There is often a trade-off between creating an oil blend that will achieve certain objectives and producing a blend that has a balanced and pleasing aroma.

There are several methods used to blend oils. One commonly used approach is the concept of ‘The Three Levels of Being’ (Tisserand, 1984), which is based upon the principle of combining essential oils according to their "energy level", odour intensity, or volatility. This method is used as a guideline for creating an oil blend such that each oil component harmonises with the other oils in the blend, and each oil can be distinguished individually.

The concept is an adaptation of the principles used by Perfumiers that categorises aromas into 3 groups likened in their aromas to musical notes: Base, Middle and Top. This idea can be further extended to include correspondences to the physical body, the mind and emotions and the spirit.

It is important to remember that the terms Base, Middle and Top are relative.

Base Notes

Base Note oils are slow acting with a long-lasting smell. In terms of combined fragrances they form the basic character of the blend, and they also act as "fixatives", slowing down the release of more volatile oils. In this way they have a "calming" effect on an oil blend, and give it "body". Gums, resins and woody oils are usually in this category of Base Notes, e.g. Sandalwood, Vetiver and Cedarwood.

Base Notes have a strengthening effect on body tissues and are often recommended for elderly and debilitated people to strengthen the physical body. They also promote proper function of the skin and mucous membranes.

Looking at mental and emotional correspondences, base notes sedate, solidify and have a "grounding" influence and are good for erratic, airy, nervous "space cadet" types and for those who have weak "connections" to the physical body.

Middle Notes

Middle note oils are considered to be Harmonisers. They have a steady evaporation rate, and "fill the gap" between the Top Notes which evaporate quickly and the Base Notes which linger on giving the oil blend roundness and fullness.

Essential oils with spicy, herbaceous "green", fresh aromas are usually categorised as Middle Notes.  Some of the floral fragrances may also fall into this category, e.g. Cardamom, Pepper, Lavender, Basil, Hyssop, Clary Sage. At least one middle note oil should be added to every oil blend to form the link between the physical and mental/emotional levels. As harmonisers, it is not surprising to find that Middle Note oils tend to correspond to the area of the body between the Navel and the Throat - i.e. they affect respiration, digestion, absorption, elimination and heart rate, with the primary effect being on the Autonomic Nervous System.

Middle Note oils also provide a "bridge" for communication between the mind and body, with a particular effect on the emotions through the Limbic System.

Top Notes

Generally, Top Note oils are stimulating and uplifting, traditionally represented by those fragrances that are the first we recognise and clearly identify in an oil blend. They are fast acting and short-lived in their effects on the body. Strong, light floral fragrances, the mints and citrus fragrances come into this category, and also some of the herbaceous “green” fragrances like Juniper, Rosemary and Sage. Top Note oils are best for people who are depressed with slow metabolic activity. The Top notes also stimulate intellectual function and provide a good "pick me up" for those who are under stress.

How to put it all together

Now that you know what functions each of the essential oils has and how to use the oil, it’s time to learn how to combine them into a specific blend that you can use in your daily life.

Let’s establish some ground rules.

Quantities and Dilutions:

All quantities and dilutions are given in ml (millilitres). For the purposes of this article, 1 ml, 1 cc (cubic centimetre) and 1 g (gram) may be regarded as interchangeable.

1 ml

=

20 Drops

5 ml

=

1 tsp.

30 ml

=

1 fl. Oz.

500 ml

=

1 pint

1000 ml

=

1 litre

 

Massage Oils

For all massage oils we use a dilution of 2.5%. This is equivalent to: 1 Drop of Essential oil to 2 ml of vegetable oil.

For example:

%

ml

Esseintial oil 'x'

2.5

1.25

=

25 drops

Almond oil

97.5

48.75

100%

50 ml

NB: There are 25 drops of essential oil to 50 ml of total blend. So, whatever size bottle you use, simply divide its capacity in mls by 2 and this will give you to total number of drops of the essential oil you need to add to the bottle.

First add the drops of essential oil and then just fill the bottle to the top with your vegetable oil.

For rheumatic pain           

Frankincense

5 drops

Eucalyptus

5 drops

Rosemary

15 drops

Almond oil

50 mls

General relaxing blend

Geranium

10 drops

Lavender

10 drops

Marjoram

5 drops

Almond oil

50 mls

These are just 2 examples to help you get started. By looking at the first article and selecting the essential oils you find indicated for a specific action, you can start to create your own massage blends.

Here’s one more

Aphrodisiac blend

Neroli

5 drops

Jasmine

5 drops

Ylang Ylang

10 drops

Clary Sage

5 drops

Almond oil

50 mls

 

Ointment

%

ml

Esseintial oil 'x'

5

1.5

=

30 drops

Almond oil

75

22.5

=

4 tsp. plus 30 drops

Beeswax

20

6 g

100

30 ml

You may need to use more than one essential oil to address the problem you are targeting, for example if you have a sore, painful, inflamed ankle, which you have sprained in say the Gym, doing exercise, you may wish to consider using oils such as Bergamot, Chamomile and Lavender. In this case you would use 10 drops of each oil NOT 30 DROPS EACH.

Inhalations

Use 8-12 drops (in total) of essential oil(s) for bowl of hot water

Baths

Use 3-5 drops in total of essential oil(s)

Now you know the basic principles and aspects of how to make your own Aromatherapy blend for some general problems.

If you are interested in more detail and greater understanding of Aromatherapy, there are some fantastic books we would highly recommend as your starting point.

The Aromatherapy Manual
by Susan Siegenthaler
(available from Wildcrafted Herbal Products - mid 2007)

The Art of Aromatherapy
by Robert Tisserand

The Practice of Aromatherapy
by Dr Jean Valnet

There are literally hundreds of books on Aromatherapy, however, the list above is a good starting point for getting the basics right and understanding the principles and concepts behind Aromatherapy.

 

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Calendula: A powerful healing plant

BotanicalCalendula grows as a common garden plant throughout North America and Europe. The golden-orange or yellow flowers of calendula have been used as medicine for centuries. Calendula is an annual garden plant with an anular, branched, hairy stem 1 to 2 feet high. The leaves are alternate, sessile, spatulate or oblanceolate, dentate with widely spaced teeth, and hairy. From June to October, the plant bears large, yellow or orange, terminal flower heads.

Biological Name: Calendula officinalis

Other Names: Marigold, garden marigold, holigold, Mary bud, pot marigold, Calendula

Parts Used: flowers, leaves


Wildcrafted Herbal Products containing Calendula officinalis include:

Rejuvenating Night Crème
Eye & Lip Crème
Age Defying Essence
Angel's Touch Hand Crème

 

Active Compounds: 

The flavonoids, found in high amounts in calendula, account for much of its anti-inflammatory activity; triterpene saponins may also be important. Calendula also contains carotenoids. Investigations into anticancer and antiviral actions of calendula are continuing. At this time, there is insufficient evidence to recommend clinical use of calendula for cancer. There is evidence suggesting use of calendula for some viral infections. The constituents responsible for these actions are not entirely clear.

Traditional Uses in Herbal Medicine:

Calendula flowers were believed to be useful in reducing inflammation, wound healing, and as an antiseptic. Calendula was used to treat various skin diseases, ranging from skin ulcerations to eczema. Internally, the soothing effects of calendula have been used for stomach ulcers and inflammation. A sterile tea has also been applied in cases of conjunctivitis. Historically, calendula is found to be antispasmodic, aperient, cholagogue, diaphoretic, vulnerary. An infusion of the flowers can be used for such gastrointestinal problems as ulcers, stomach cramps, colitis, and diarrhea. It is also useful taken internally for fever, boils, abscesses, and to prevent recurrent vomiting. The fresh juice of the herb or flowers can substitute for the infusion. For external use, a good salve for wounds can be made from dried flowers or leaves, from the juice pressed out of the fresh flowers, or from the tincture. The salve or dilute tincture is good for bruises, sprains, pulled muscles, sores, and boils. The tincture is used internally for gastritis and for menstrual difficulties.

Calendula may be useful in the treatment of:

  • Eczema
  • Gastritis
  • Minor burns (including sunburn)
  • Wound healing

Applied locally as a tincture, oil, or lotion, marigold is considered a natural antiseptic by homeopaths. The crushed petals may be combined with olive oil to form an ointment for external application to cuts, bruises, sores and burns.

The infusion is used to soothe watery, irritated eyes, and for relief in bronchial complaints. It is also used frequently in the treatment of liver disorders. It is thought to induce perspiration in case of fever. Recent clinical studies have shown that marigold flower extracts lower blood pressure and have sedative effects. Marigold is a common adulterant to saffron.

In 1955, an Australian patent was issued for the use of marigold extracts in the treatment of burns in humans.

Other indications include:

Antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, healing, amd soothing.

Infusion of the petals used as lotion for skin cleansing and softening.

Taken internally for poor circulation, varicose veins, ulcers, colitis, stomach cramps; also, headaches, toothache, ague, and skin problems.

Said to strengthen and comfort the heart and aid in digestion.

For external use, an oil is made from the flowers for skin problems and sunburn; used in ointment form to heal acne and fade old scars and for external sores, cuts, bruises, burns and rashes.

Usually combined with chamomile and comfrey for a soothing ointment in cases of skin problems, burns, cuts, insect bites, stings and bruises.

An infusion from the leaves is used for tired swollen feet.

Flowers used in infusion form as a wash for red eye.

 

Dosage:

A tea of calendula can be made by pouring 200 ml of boiling water over 1-2 teaspoons of the flowers, which is steeped, covered for ten to fifteen minutes, strained, and then drunk. At least 3 cups of tea are generally drunk per day.

Tincture is similarly used three times a day, taking 1-2 ml each time. The tincture can be taken in water or tea.

Prepared ointments are often useful for skin problems, although wet dressings made by dipping cloth into the tea (after it has cooled) are also effective. Home treatment for eye conditions is not recommended, as absolute sterility must be maintained.

Juice: Take 1 tsp. At a time, always freshly pressed.

Tincture: To make, soak a handful of flowers in 0.5 quart rectified alcohol or whiskey for 5 to 6 weeks. A dose is 5 to 20 drops.

Salve: Boil 1 oz dried flowers or leaves, or 1tsp fresh juice, with 1 oz of lard.

Safety:

Except for the very rare person who is allergic to calendula and therefore should not use it, there are no known side effects or interactions.

 

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We hope you enjoyed these articles and invite you to send us suggestions of topics you would like to see us cover in the coming months. Your suggestions are always welcome and we endeavour to cover the topics you would like to know more about - so don't be shy, drop us a line or two!

Also there are some great new posts in the forum and we look forward to 'seeing' you there.

In good health

Danny & Susan Siegenthaler

 

© Copyright: Wildcrafted Herbal Products, 2007

Wildcrafted's Natural Skin Care Newsletter - Back Issues

Kitty's Corner

Kitty

Happy New Year to you all and a hearty Miau.

I hope you enjoyed the last column and managed to dry up those weeping eyes.

If you have any questions just send me an email and I'll give it a shot.

This month we'll look at Heat Stress and How heat can affect your beloved pet.

With Summer already having produced temperatures in excess of 40°C (over 110° Fahrenheit), and the hottest times not here yet, your pet is likely to experience heat stress this summer.

It is imperative that you, our loving owners are aware of some of the basics behind it all - so here it goes:

Normal body heat regulation
Our bodies produce heat from:
• Normal daily activities e.g. heart beating, kidneys producing urine
• Food digestion
• Exercise

We loose heat in a number of ways:
• Panting
• Increased rate of respiration
• Not eating
• Dilation of the skin's blood vessels
• Lying around
• Looking for cool places
• Drinking water

Clinical signs of Heat Stress
• Body temperature in excess of 41 degrees
• Panting
• Dark gum colour
• Vomiting
• Diarrhoea (often bloody)
• Shock
• Collapse
• Loss of consciousness
• Loss of body’s normal control of body temperature regulation

Causes of Heat Stress
Nearly all cases of heat stress have a pre-existing disease present such as:
• Upper airway disease
• Cardiovascular disease
• Fever from an infection
• Dehydration from recent vomiting and/or diarrhoea
• Obesity
• Previous episode of heat stroke causing permanent damage to the brains control centre for heat regulation

Pre-disposing factors
Heat stroke in a previously healthy animal occurs in the following conditions:
• Over exertion
• Locked in cars/poorly ventilated cages and looked up houses
• Effects of heat stroke on the body organs.

Untreated heat stroke can cause major damage to the internal organs of the body:
• Brain damage
• Blood clotting problems- either early or some days later
• Bloody watery diarrhoea
• Liver damage
• Kidney damage

As you can see, we too get hot on those hot Australian summer days and you can help us by keeping use cool.

Make sure we have plenty of water - renew the water from time to time to keep it cool - you don't like drinking luckwarm water either, do you?

If it becomes obvious that your pet is not handling the heat wet their coat and maybe a part of the ground where your pet can lie down.

You could put a wet towel in the fridge for a few minutes to make it cold and then put it over your pet.

If you have airconditioning, turn it on before you go out, if you are leaving your pet at home.

If your pet is not responding to any of your helpful attempts take them to the vet as quickly as possible, because if you don't they could die.

Stay cool and enjoy the summer.

 

For now, Miau from me, until next month.

Paw

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Why you should Choose Holistically Natural Skin Care Products made by Wildcrafted Herbal Products

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Topical Articles on skin care and the benefits of using NATURAL skin care products
 
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Why you should Choose Holistically Natural Skin Care Products made by Wildcrafted Herbal Products

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Look Younger & Feel Younger with Wildcrafted's Age-Defying Essence

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Got a heath problem and need some professional advice? - Consult our Virtual Herbalist - it's easy and it's free.

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Age Defying Natural  Skin Care Systems for even the most sensitive skin types.


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Testimonials

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Want Chemical-free, Natural Skin Care?
Choose Wildcrafted Herbal Products to Look After Your Skin Naturally.

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It's a Guy Thing?
Men too need to look after their skin - but is men's skin different?

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Visit our Natural Skin Care Forum - It's fun, Informative and full of handy tips.

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Natural Skin Care Blog A selection of interesting Articles on natural skin care.

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Kurmond, NSW, 2757
Australia

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